Are Plus Size Women Healthy Or Unhealthy?

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I was skimming through Facebook the other day and came across this really interesting read. It is quite insightful with the different angles of the topic being discussed and opening up avenues for discussion. I hope you find the read as interesting as I did!

The Truth About Whether ‘Plus-Size’ Women Are Actually Unhealthy

Ashley Graham, the first plus size clothing model to grace the cover of Sports Illustrated’s swimsuit issue, looks absolutely gorgeous in the mag this month.

But yesterday, Cheryl Teigs, a 68-year-old former SI swimsuit edition cover model, made some pretty loaded comments in an interview with E! about Ashley’s weight. “I don’t like that we’re talking about full-figured women because it’s glamorizing them because your waist should be smaller than 35 [inches],” she said. “That’s what Dr. Oz said, and I’m sticking to it. No, I don’t think it’s healthy. Her face is beautiful. Beautiful. But I don’t think it’s healthy in the long run.”

She then went further on Twitter:

”To clarify re bodyweight. Being anorexic/bulimic/overweight all connected to health problems. I want all to be as healthy as they can.”

— Cheryl Tiegs (@CherylTiegs) February 26, 2016

 

So can you really equate being plus-size with being unhealthy?

Absolutely not, says Michelle May, M.D., founder of Am I Hungry? Mindful Eating Programs and Training. “I do not agree with Cheryl at all—she’s completely inaccurate,” says May, who adds that comments like the ones Cheryl made lead to weight bias, stigma, and judgment.

A recent study published in the International Journal of Obesity found that body mass index (BMI) is not a reliable way to measure someone’s health. Researchers at the University of California-Los Angeles found that close to half of Americans (34.4 million to be exact) who are considered overweight by their BMI number (25 to 29.9) are healthy, as are 19.8 million who are considered obese (that would be a BMI of 30 and up).

And, more than 30 percent of people who have BMIs in the “normal” range (18.5 to 24.9) are unhealthy. This group of people often goes without having diseases diagnosed until they’re in advanced stages, since they believe they’re healthy, says Linda Bacon, Ph.D., a researcher at the University of California-Davis and author of Body Respect: What Conventional Health Books Get Wrong, Leave Out, and Just Plain Fail to Understand About Weight. Even when you see disease more among heavier people, it’s because of other variables correlated with a heavier weight, not the weight itself, says Bacon. For example, there’s a strong correlation between weight and poverty and a strong correlation between poverty and poor health, she says.

“What that tells us is that when we try to assess a person’s health simply by looking at them, we’re going to make major mistakes,” says May. You can’t—and shouldn’t—judge a woman’s health by how she looks in her plus size evening wear or a swimsuit. Case closed.

 

You can find the full article here: http://www.womenshealthmag.com/weight-loss/ashley-graham-plus-size-model-is-she-unhealthy

For Obese Patients, There Are Big Health Benefits in Small Weight Loss

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In England, the obese population has risen from 15% to 26% in the past 20 years, with the proportion classified as overweight hovering at around 37%. Photograph: Garo/Phanie/REX Shutterstock

A story in the Guardian this morning has an article with claims that could benefit a large portion of our population. A recent study shows that obese people if they just lost just 5% of their weight, will see  ‘profound benefits’ through better control of insulin in the liver, fat and muscle tissues. Quite amazing when you think about this.

Even small reductions in bodyweight can have a profound impact on the health of obese people and their risk of future disease, researchers say.

A study of 40 obese men and women aged 32 to 56 found that losing just 5% of their weight led to substantial improvements in health through the better control of insulin in the liver, fat and muscle tissues.

The changes led to a lower risk of diabetes and heart disease, which along with cancer, rank among the most serious complications that people with obesity face.

Samuel Klein, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at Washington University in St Louis, said that expert societies generally recommend obese people to lose 5 to 10% of their bodyweight if they want to improve their health. But until now, there has been little research into the effects of losing 5% rather than 10%, which is tougher to achieve.

The researchers followed 20 obese people who maintained their bodyweight during the study, and another 20 who were tasked with losing 5% of their weight initially, and then 10% and 15% as the study went on. In the weight loss group, 19 people managed to lose 5% in weight. Of these, nine went on to lose 10% and later, 15% of their bodyweight.

Tests on the volunteers found that most of the improvements in so-called insulin sensitivity were seen with the first 5% of weight loss. For a person weighing 100kg, or 15 stone 7 pounds, that amounts to losing 5kg or 11lbs. The study is published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

A host of diseases linked to obesity are caused by the body losing its ability to control insulin. When working properly, the hormone slows the release of fatty acids from fat into the bloodstream. In the liver, it suppresses glucose production, and keeps blood sugar low. In muscle, insulin stimulates the uptake of glucose, again keeping blood sugar down. “Insulin is a key regulatory hormone that underlies the pathogenesis of many cardio-metabolic diseases,” said Klein.

Stephen O’Rahilly, director of the MRC Metabolic Diseases Unit at Cambridge University said the results “provide a solid foundation for believing that even modest amounts of weight loss will bring health benefits.”

In England, the obese population has risen from 15% to 26% in the past 20 years[pdf], with the proportion classified as overweight hovering at around 37%. Only a third of men in England and about 40% of women have a healthy body mass index, defined as between 18.5 and 24.9. The rise in obesity in the UK is mirrored in other countries, such as the US and Australia, where obesity rates have reached 35% and 28% respectively.

“This is an important message for healthcare professionals to get across to patients in that even if this weight loss might seem small in terms of patient expectations, it conveys a significant health benefit. Clearly if you lose more weight the benefits are even greater,” said Jeremy Tomlinson, professor of metabolic endocrinology at Oxford University.

Tracy Parker, a heart health dietitian at the British Heart Foundation, added: “This study is good news for people who struggle with their weight as it suggests that even losing a small amount of weight can have a positive impact on heart health.

“As little as 5% weight loss resulted in improved blood pressure, levels of triglyceride fats in the blood, and blood sugar which are all risk factors for heart disease. Losing more weight was shown to further improve heart health. This study is a reminder of the benefits of gradually getting to a healthy weight. Setting realistic goals such as 5% weight loss is a good way to maintain healthy weight loss.

“When it comes to reducing your risk of cardiovascular disease, lifestyle changes do not just apply to losing weight. Giving up smoking, decreasing your alcohol intake and being more physically active all help reduce our risk of developing heart disease.”

Original story here: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/feb/22/small-weight-loss-brings-big-health-benefits-for-obese-patients

A World First-Australian Surgeon Inserts 3D-printed Vertebrae

The field of medicine has taken another leap forward. this report which was aired on the ABC in Melbourne shows that an Australian neurosurgeon has completed a world-first marathon surgery removing cancer-riddled vertebrae and successfully replacing them with a 3D-printed body part. the transcript of the story is below:

MATT WORDSWORTH, PRESENTER: An Australian neurosurgeon has delivered a world-first, successfully removing two cancerous vertebrae from a patient’s neck and replacing them with a 3D-printed artificial bone part. There was a risk the patient would die on the operating table during the mammoth 15-hour surgery, which first separated and then successfully reattached the skull to the spinal tissue with the new 3D-printed bone. Doctors say 3D-printed body parts will spearhead a new wave of medicine, allowing customised replacements of bones and organs. Conor Duffy reports.

RALPH MOBBS, NEUROSURGEON: The patient’s head is attached to almost like a GPS tracking system, which is this attached to that machine there.

CONOR DUFFY, REPORTER: At the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sydney, a man’s life is in the balance as neurosurgeon Dr Ralph Mobbs reaches a critical stage of 15-hour surgery.

RALPH MOBBS: This is high-risk surgery. There’s no doubt about it. We’re operating at the top of the spinal cord and the brain stem. There are large blood vessels that feed the – feed the brain and all of those structures are immediately adjacent to where we’re operating.

CONOR DUFFY: It’s the first time in the world this operation has been attempted.

RALPH MOBBS: The surgery that we’re doing today is a particularly complicated and long and difficult surgery. It involves exposure at the top of the neck where the neck and the head meets. And it’s essentially disattaching the patient’s head from his neck and taking the tumour out and reattaching his head back onto his neck.

CONOR DUFFY: The patient, Drage Josevski, has a rare and particularly nasty type of spinal cancer called chordoma. The X-rays show Drage’s tumour is in a very dangerous position and is constricting his top two vertebra.

RALPH MOBBS: Without surgery and without treatment of this type of tumour, the outlook for this patient would be particularly nasty and a particularly horrific way of dying. It’s – there’s no two ways about it. He would gradually lose function of his arms and legs, gradually lose function of his capacity to breathe, eat. Let’s not take it too far further than that. It’s not a pleasant death at all.

CONOR DUFFY: Dr Mobbs custom designed this operation and used computer models to plan it out well before arriving in theatre. Surgeons have to enter through the patient’s mouth, remove the tumour as well as the top two vertebra and replace them with a titanium 3D-printed body part.

RALPH MOBBS: So this is the front of the neck where the tumour is being resected from and this is the space that we will have at the completion of the completion of the tumour resection. As you can see, it’s a large gap. But we’ve pre-planned the prosthesis to fit perfectly in place, like a glove, and that will form the stability for where the neck and the head meet so that his head won’t fall off.

ANATOMICS REPRESENTATIVE (Advertisement): Anatomics manufactures surgical implants from a range of materials and they include acrylic, titanium, and more recently, porous polyethylene.

CONOR DUFFY: The three-dimensional body part was designed by a Victorian company called Anatomics, who say this technology is for everybody, whether you wear size small clothing or plus size clothing. This new range of products are allowing surgeons to consider a whole new suite of operations that were once unthinkable.

How important do you think 3D-printed body parts are to the future of medicine?

RALPH MOBBS: Oh, huge, massive. I mean, 3D printing of body parts is the next phase of individualised health care. To restore bones, joints, organs with this type of technology really is super exciting. And, you know, Australia is supposed to be the smart country. Well, here is our opportunity to really take it out there and to keep pushing the boundaries on the whole 3D-printed body part business.

CONOR DUFFY: It’s only now, two months after the 15-hour surgery, that Dr Ralph Mobbs is about to deliver the news on whether the tumour was successfully removed and replaced by the 3D-printed body part. It felt like I was in a museum and art design class.

RALPH MOBBS: I must say that it was a delight to put in, because after spending 15 hours taking out a very complicated tumour, it was beautiful just to slot in the implant and to have it fit so nicely and to be able to reconstruct the space left by the tumour. The surgery went really, really well.

CONOR DUFFY: Drage has unexpectedly good movement in his neck and it appears the tumour has been removed. But there was a complication. Drage’s having trouble eating and speaking and that’s expected to take some months to heal.

RALPH MOBBS: The complications that you’ve currently got are all related to the fact that we’ve gone through your mouth and we’ve stretched your mouth open for many, many hours and it’s – the complications are related to the fact that there’s been a prolonged exposure through your mouth.

TANYA JOSEVSKA, DAUGHTER: Every day he gets better and better. I think his speech is improving. I know that there’s a long way to go with that. There is so much faith in this process that one day he may even be able to build museum custom showcases.

CONOR DUFFY: Drage’s daughter Tanya and his wife Lila helped translate during his interview with 7.30, reliving the longest day of their lives.

TANYA JOSEVSKA: It was just really hard for Dad knowing that that’s what he had to go through. And not knowing what the outcome would be, as he said, like, we didn’t know if he could die in the operation. We didn’t know what kind of complications could happen. I mean, the doctors explained it, but you never really know.

LILA JOSEVSKA, WIFE: I have a some gift for you.

RALPH MOBBS: Yeah? Oh, wow!

LILA JOSEVSKA: You saved life to my husband. And thank you very much.

RALPH MOBBS: Oh, thank you very much.

LILA JOSEVSKA: You make an amazing, amazing job.

RALPH MOBBS: Oh, thank you.

LILA JOSEVSKA: Thank you very much.

RALPH MOBBS: Thank you.

TANYA JOSEVSKA: He’s just excited to be around for my wedding and to, um, grandkids, to see his grandkids grow up and just be in our life. That’s why he did the operation.

MATT WORDSWORTH: Conor Duffy with that report.

 

How They Print Bones in 3D

Original Story found at http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2015/s4411612.htm

Plus Size Women Models Are Everywhere. But Where Are The Men?

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When you think about the word ‘plus size’ or ‘plus size clothes, what gender automatically comes into your mind? Is it a male or female? I am going to guess that the majority of you had a picture of a plus sized woman in your mind, am I correct? Well, in fact you are not alone, a large proportion of the population thought the same as you. It seems that men are being forgotten when it comes to ‘plus size’ advertising. You may see the occasional plus size guy in a movie, but when do you actually see the larger guy shown in admirable television advertisements and seen as fashionable? And why isn’t the term ‘plus size’ used for these guys?

A study was undertaken to seek the answer.

 

So when is a male classified as ‘plus-size’?

This a very puzzling question. To be honest, there is no real clear-cut answer to this question. No real distinction between men and women. Many suggest that the answer is that a male is considered as plus sized when his weight exceeds the average weight of the male population.

According to the CDCP (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), the average waist measurements of American males is currently 39.7 inches, which equates to a pant size ranging between 38 and 40. By using this information, an informed conclusion could be that a male can be classified as ‘plus size’ when his waist size exceeds the average of 38 to 40 inches. In saying this, men are actually portrayed as being ‘larger’ when they are actually quite close to the average size of the countries male population.

 

Why the lack of ‘big bro’s’ modelling?

Contrary to what many believe, there are larger men in the fashion industry who are considered to be ‘plus-size’. They are just in very small numbers.

Why you ask. This has everything to do with the very limited ranges available to larger models to dress plus size If you compare the extensive range of plus size women’s clothing compared to male large size clothing, there is a very large differential. There are many plus size woman models who are releasing their own clothing lines, for lingerie, sleepwear and everyday clothing as compared to the very limited variety offered to larger men. Not to mention, men’s plus size clothes only get advertised when there are new clothing lines when there are new releases, which is a downside to the sheer size of the men’s large size clothing industry.

To read more about this interesting topic, please feel free to click on the link below to the original article.

http://mic.com/articles/134032/female-plus-size-models-are-on-the-rise-so-where-are-all-the-plus-size-men#.vt01RxQrf